What Eric Lefkofsky Di in Answer to His Wife’s Cancer

Friends often designate Eric Lefkofsky, a “serial entrepreneur.” However, with the multiple charitable interests that he and his wife Liz donate time and money to, the correct designation should be “serial philanthropist.” Instead of sitting on the sidelines with the money they have generated, this couple invests considerable funds and ample time into a series of charities in the fields of education, health, human rights, arts and culture, and the development of new technologies for the advancement of those other interests in which they were involved for more info: http://www.chicagobusiness.com/article/20161001/ISSUE01/310019995/can-eric-lefkofsky-save-your-life click here.

As an entrepreneur, Eric started as a carpet salesman in his college years. Eric did not rest after school. He immediately threw himself into business, sometimes failing, sometimes succeeding, but always learning. Today, Eric Lefkofsky works adjunct professor at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business, is a Co-Founder of such businesses as Groupon, Zest Health, Echo Global Logistics, and Inner Workings. He is a Founding Partner in Lightbank, and Co-Founder and CEO pf Tempus. With boundless energy and a wealth of experience in the business community, Eric’s record speaks for itself.

Currently, Eric is concentrating on the creation of databases to facilitate the understanding of how cancer treatments work. Eric, with the force of Liz behind him, helped to found Tempus for the specific purpose of creating an overlay system atop the already existing Medical Record System to facilitate interaction and discovery of how cancer treatments successfully work for one set of people living with cancer but not for others.

Eric came up with the idea following Liz’s breast cancer diagnosis. The couple was stunned to learn while sitting together in the oncologist’s office discussing treatment options, thatoncologists had no access to information to answer questions about why some cancer patients reacted well to treatments while others did not.

The answer to the conundrum, at least for Eric, was to create a system which would allow oncologists to find information regarding cancer treatment success or failures for patients similar to the patient currently sitting in their office. Thus, the concept of the overlay system that would sift through medical records, find similar cases, and analyze the correct treatment bore the fruit of Tempus.

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